Intro to cyber threat intelligence

knowyourenemyThe traditional security monitoring and incident response (IR) capability that has being used across the enterprises in the last decade has fallen behind. It is consensus across the IT security industry that we need a more robust, capable and efficient security monitoring and IR framework. The new framework should enable us to combine security and intelligence functions. An intelligence driven security that allows us to plan for, manage, detect and respond to all categories of threats even as they become more frequent and severe. In other words we want to maximize the organization effectiveness and efficiency to block, detect and respond to attacks. How? By introducing into the traditional security stack the threat intelligence security function we can do more and better.

Following the last post about about what intelligence means and what is the 5 steps of the intelligence cycle below an introduction to  Cyber Threat Intelligence topic.  A quick summary on what is threat intelligence, what is its value and what are the sources to consume or produce intel. More about this topic will follow in future posts.

What is Cyber Threat Intelligence?
Threat intelligence is a recent paradigm in the IT security field that continues to gain a lot of traction due to a change of focus in the risk equation from the vulnerability into the threat. Tracking threats that are specific to your industry, organization or region is key to minimize damage that can caused by an attack.

On the one hand we have strategic threat intelligence. A capability that needs processes, tools and people to leverage an understanding about the attacker’s capabilities and intents. Is normally delivered through reports that are produced by humans and consumed by humans and is the most expensive and hardest to produce. It produces information to support well informed decisions of long-lasting importance such as which policies and processes should change. Or what new changes one should accommodate in the security infrastructure to adapt to the new threat landscape.From a well-established and mature strategic threat intelligence practice you should be able to get answers to questions like: Who is your potential adversary? What is the adversary’s capability to cause you harm? Do they have the intent to cause harm? Where are you vulnerable? How could anyone harm your organization if they wanted to do so?

On the other hand, we have tactical threat intelligence. A capability that aids the prevention, detection and response competencies with real time threat data that is consumed across different systems and functions. Data such as IP addresses, domain names, URLs, email addresses, hashes values, HTTP user agents, registry keys, etc. Remnant pieces of information left by an attacker that can be used to identify threats or malicious actors. These pieces of information are nowadays called indicators of compromise and can, for example, be used to search and identify compromised systems.  This thread data is tactical threat intelligence and is of limited life span. Tactical threat intelligence should be disseminated, integrated and consumed in an automated fashion.  This type of threat intelligence is the cheapest and easiest to create.

What is the value of Cyber Threat Intelligence?
At the strategic level, the value proposition of threat intelligence might include:

  • Make well informed decisions on where you are spending your security dollars.
  • Create comprehensive insight about the threats by developing facts, findings and forecasts about threat actor’s capabilities, motives and tradecraft.
  • Create recommended courses of action on how to adapt to the evolving threat landscape in order to reduce and mitigate risks.
  • Being able to plan for, manage and respond to all categories of threats – even as they become more frequent and more severe.
  • Develop situational awareness about capabilities and intents of your adversaries.
  • Know your adversary and what are they looking for.

At the tactical level, the value proposition of threat intelligence might include:

  • Minimize the risk of attacks that could result in lost revenue, public embarrassment, and regulatory penalties.
  • Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of security monitoring capabilities by integrating and matching threat intel data.
  • Augment security operations and incident response functions with actionable threat data.
  • Reduce the number false positives by adding threat intel data into security operations.
  • Accelerate Incident Response actions and remediation priorities based on targeted information.

What are the sources of Cyber Threat Intelligence?
The sources might vary depending if you are a consumer or a producer of threat intelligence. From a consumer perspective – where the majority of the organizations fit in – they mainly fall into two categories. The open source ones that are free and can be retrieved by anyone. And the closed sources that are commercial or with restricted access. These ones often need a payed subscriptions or being member of a closed circle of trust. Either one, they fall under tactical threat intel when data is delivered to the consumer trough feeds with indicators of compromise. Or they fall under strategic threat intel when the deliverables is a report about capabilities and intents of malicious actors.

From a producer perspective the sources are even broader and using different disciplines. Normally, if you are a service provider there is the incentive to produce it using the most variety of sources, methods and disciplines. Mainly due to the fact service providers do it for a profit. For example, iSight Partners, Dell SecureWorks, Mandiant or CrowdStrike are good examples of service providers that create strategic and tactical threat intelligence combined together. They have dedicated teams of researches that perform all kinds of activities, some of which might be almost considered under intel agencies or law enforcement umbrella. Examples of sources used across producers are honeypots and spam traps that are used to gather intelligence trough the knowledge and information that one could obtain by observing, analyzing and investigating the attacker that are lured to it. Another source could be the output of doing static and dynamic malware analysis.

 

References:
How to Collect, Refine, Utilize and Create Threat Intelligence by Anton Chuvakin
Security Science by Clifton Smith; David J Brooks
Intelligence-Based Security in Private Industry by Thomas A. Trier

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